AurieaHarvey About Context Contact Index Random
Trail: OneHundredYearsOfSolitude

OneHundredYearsOfSolitude

Quoth

Monday
2006-06-02_champagne_10h21

Arcadio Buendia’s last words

“Tell my wife,” he answered in a well-modulated voice, “to give the girl the name of Ursula.” He paused and said it again: “Ursula, like her grandmother. And tell her also that if the child that is to be born is a boy, they should name him Jose Arcadio, not for his uncle, but for his grandfather.”

Before they took him to the execution wall Father Nicanor tried to attend him. “I have nothing to repent,” Arcadio said, and he put himself under the orders of the squad after drinking a cup of black coffee. The leader of the squad, a specialist in summary executions, had a name that had much more about it than chance: Captain Roque Carnicero, which meant butcher. On the way to the cemetery, under the persistent drizzle, Arcadio saw that a radiant Wednesday was breaking out on the horizon. His nostalgia disappeared with the mist and left an immense curiosity in its place. Only when they ordered him to put his back to the wall did Arcadio see Rebeca, with wet hair and a pink flowered dress, opening wide the door. He made an effort to get her to recognize him. And Rebeca did take a casual look toward the wall and was paralyzed with stupor, barely able to react and wave good-bye to Arcadio. Arcadio answered her the same way. At that instant the smoking mouths of the rifles were aimed at him and letter by letter he heard the encyclicals that Melquiades had chanted and he heard the lost steps of Santa Sofia de la Piedad, a virgin, in the classroom, and in his nose he felt the same icy hardness that had drawn his attention in the nostrils of the corpse of Remedios. “Oh, God damn it!” he managed to think. “I forgot to say that if it was a girl they should name her Remedios.” Then, all accumulated in the rip of a claw, he felt again all the terror that had tormented him in his life. The captain gave the order to fire. Arcadio barely had time to put out his chest and raise his head, not understanding where the hot liquid that burned his thighs was pouring from.

“Bastards!” he shouted. “Long live the Liberal party!”

- One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez